Categories
Life hack

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Marshall is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer based in Tokyo, Japan, runs VGKAMI and ITEnterpriser, and spends what little free time he has learning Japanese. Read more.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

The internet is full of unwanted content, so you might want to restrict access to certain sites. While there’s no built-in feature in Mozilla Firefox for blocking websites, there are extensions that will get the job done.

Block a Website in Firefox on a Desktop

To block a website in Firefox on your desktop PC or Mac, open Firefox and head to Mozilla’s official site for add-ons. In the search bar in the top-right corner of the window, type “Block Site.” Select the first item in the search results.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

On the next page, you’ll see some information about the extension, including the developer’s name and a brief description of the extension. Click “Add to Firefox.”

A message appears asking you to add Block Site. Essentially, this is asking your permission to:

  • Access your data for all websites
  • Display notifications
  • Access your browser tabs (in this case, only in Mozilla Firefox)

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Another message appears, confirming that the Block Site extension has been added to Firefox. You can also select the checkbox next to the “Allow this Extension to Run in Private Windows” option if you want to enable it.

When you’re done, click “Okay, Got it.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Now that the extension is added to Firefox, you can manage its settings. Click the hamburger menu at the top right to display the browser menu, and then click “Add-Ons.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Alternatively, you can access Firefox’s add-ons by pressing Ctrl+Shift+A (Command+Shift+A on Mac), or by typing “about:addons” in the address bar.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

In the pane on the left, click “Extensions.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

A list of your installed extensions will appear. Find “Block Site” and click the three dots next to it.

Select “Options” in the menu that appears.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

On the next page, type the name of the website you want to block in the “Block a New Hostname” text box. Click “Add” to add the website to the block list.

You can also set a schedule for when to block the website. This is handy if you don’t want your children on Facebook after a certain time on school nights, for example.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Click “Save” in the “Tools” section to save your changes. You can ensure your settings can’t be changed if you set a master password.

Now, whenever someone tries to access the website(s) on the block list, they’ll see the message below.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Block a Website in Firefox on Mobile

The process for blocking a site in Firefox is a bit different on your iPhone, iPad, or Android device. Android provides a little more flexibility than iOS and iPadOS. You can download a free add-on for Android called Leechblock NG. It has mostly positive ratings, and it’s Firefox-specific, meaning it won’t restrict sites in other browsers, like Google Chrome.

After you install Leechblock NG, you just add the sites you want to block to the block list.

If you want to block a site on your iPhone or iPad, however, you have to do so via Screen Time. Any site you add to that list isn’t just blocked in Firefox; it’s blocked in any browser on any device that uses your iCloud account.

To set it up, go to Settings > Screen Time > Content and Privacy Restrictions. Toggle-On the “Content and Privacy Restrictions” option, and then tap “Content Restrictions.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

On the next screen, tap “Web Content.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Next, tap “Limit Adult Websites,” and then tap “Add Website” under “Never Allow.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Type the URL of the website you want to block, and then tap “Done.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

This website will now be blocked in Firefox and other browsers on your iPhone or iPad.

This article explains how to prevent children from using Firefox, block websites or filter website content in Firefox that may be offensive or inappropriate for children.

Firefox checks the parental controls on your computer and sets itself to Prefer:Safe mode. This automatically turns on the safety feature on each website your child visits, as long as you have the parental controls active on your computer.

This feature can be turned off only through your password-protected parental settings on your operating system, so your child will not be able to deactivate this feature through the browser.

To turn on parental controls on your computer, please see the support documentation for your operating system or see the following:

  • Getting started with Microsoft Family Safety at microsoft.com.
  • Set up family features on Windows 10 at microsoft.com.
  • Set up Family Safety at microsoft.com.
  • How To Use Parental Controls in Windows 7 at howtogeek.com and Safeguarding Windows 7 – Parental Controls at microsoft.com.
  • Set up Family Sharing on Mac and Set up content and privacy restrictions in Screen Time on Mac at apple.com.

In addition to parental controls built into your operating system, third-party software is also available. For a list of web filtering software, see Comparison of content-control software and providers at wikipedia.org.

This addons.mozilla.org search for parental control lists several extensions that can provide content blocking.

These fine people helped write this article:

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Volunteer

Grow and share your expertise with others. Answer questions and improve our knowledge base.

Search Support

  1. Home
  2. Support Forums
  3. Firefox
  4. how to block a website?

Avoid support scams. We will never ask you to call or text a phone number or share personal information. Please report suspicious activity using the “Report Abuse” option.

Learn More

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

how to block a website?

  • 4 replies
  • 40 have this problem
  • 75 views
  • Last reply by Hasan

i cant block a site

Chosen solution

You could use this extension to “block” within Firefox and only for Firefox.
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/blocksite/

The HOSTS file will affect all browsers in that PC equally.

All Replies (4)

Close All Web Browsers -> Open My Computer -> go to Windows Drive (C:\) -> Windows -> System32 -> drivers -> etc -> open “hosts” file in Notepad -> at the end of the file write

xyz = the website you want to block

Save the file and exit. Now restart your web browser. Check and tell if its working.

Modified July 10, 2011 at 1:38:03 AM PDT by Hasan

Chosen Solution

You could use this extension to “block” within Firefox and only for Firefox.
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/blocksite/

The HOSTS file will affect all browsers in that PC equally.

tnx a lot. it works.

To help other users find solutions, please return to this Thread and Sign-in to the

forum with your Username and Password:

click on “Solved It” next to the reply ABOVE that BEST solved your question

DO NOT click “Solved It” next to this reply

There could be multiple reasons why you want to restrict access to certain websites. Maybe you want to block websites to avoid distractions, or you just want to block malicious websites. Whatever the reason, you can easily block websites in your favorite web browser.

At techviral, we have already shared an article on howblock websites in chrome. Today, we will discuss the same for the Firefox browser.

Like Chrome, you can install add-ons in Mozilla Firefox to improve the browser’s functionality. Similarly, there are Firefox add-ons available to block certain websites. With site blocker extensions, you can easily block any time-consuming or annoying website.

Steps to block a website in Mozilla Firefox Browser

So, in this article, we are going to share a working method to block a website on the Firefox web browser.

To block websites in Firefox we are going to use the‘Block site’extension. With this Firefox extension, one canEasily block unwanted domains and prevent access to various websites. So, let’s see how to use the Block Site extension in the Firefox browser.

Step 1.First of all, open this block site extension page and click the‘Add Firefox’button.

Step 2.In the next pop-up window, click the‘Add’button.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxClick the ‘Add’ button

Step 3.Firefox will now display a success message, click the‘Ok I have it’button.

Step 4.now come in‘about: plugins’in the address bar.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxEnter ‘about:plugins’ in the address bar

Step 5.The above URL will open the Addon Manager in Firefox. In the left side panel, select‘extensions’

Step 6.Now click on the‘three points’near the Block site extension.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxClick on the ‘three dots’ near the Block Site extension

Step 7.Select‘Options’in the menu that appears.

Step 8.On the next page, type the URL of the website you want to block and click the‘Add’button.

Enter the URL and click the ‘Add’ button

Step 9.Scroll down to the‘Instruments’menu and click the‘Save’button. You also canset a master password to unlockthe website blocked.

Once this is done, every time you try to access the blocked site, you will see a screen like the one below.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxThe blocked website

Other extensions to block sites in Firefox

Just like site blocking, you can use other firefox extensions to block distracting sites. Check out the three best Firefox extensions to block sites in 2020.

1.digital detox

Well, Digital Detox is one of the best extensions to block websites in Firefox. The good thing is that it adds a button on the toolbar that allows you to add websites to the block list. The extension also automatically restores tabs when the lock is disabled.

two.LeechBlock NG

It is one of the best productivity extensions for Firefox that you can use today. With this extension, you can block all time-wasting sites. To block sites, you can create profiles. With each profile, you can block 30 websites, with different times and days for each set.

3.impulse blocker

With Impulse Blocker, you can easily block any website. To block any site with Impulse Blocker, you just need to visit any site and click on the extension icon. You will be prompted to specify a time period, simply set the time and the site will be blocked. You can further explore the options page to manually add sites to the block list.

So, that’s all from us for today. With this Firefox extension, you can easily block any website. I hope this article has helped you! Please share it with your friends too.

Twitter LinkedIn icon The word “in”.

LinkedIn Fliboard icon A stylized letter F.

Flipboard Facebook Icon The letter F.

Email Link icon An image of a chain link. It symobilizes a website link url.

  • You can easily block a website on Firefox by using a Block Site extension.
  • After downloading the third-party extension, you can add websites to a blocked list in Firefox’s “Add-Ons” menu.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

You can easily block websites on Firefox — but you’ll need to download an extension first.

Then, you can access your settings and add blocked websites to the “Add-ons” section of your Firefox Settings menu.

Along with adding a site to the list, you can also add a password to unlock blocked sites or have blocked sites instead redirect to a different website.

You can also delete sites from the list at any time.

Here’s how to do block sites on Firefox.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

MacBook Pro (From $1,299.99 at Best Buy)

Lenovo IdeaPad 130 (From $299.99 at Best Buy)

How to download the Block Site desktop extension for Firefox

Before using the Block Site extension, you’ll have to download it to your PC or Mac computer. You can easily find the extension by searching for it on Google or by heading to the main Mozilla site.

1. Click the blue “Add to Firefox” button.

2. This will open a pop-up confirming the decision. Click “Add.” This grants the extension permission to access your data, browser tabs, and display any notifications.

3. Firefox will automatically add the extension to your browser. A separate pop-up will appear confirming that it has been added, along with instructions on how to manage your add-ons.

How to block a website on Firefox using the Block Site extension

1. Click the three bars in the top-right corner of your screen.

2. Click “Add-ons.”

  • You can also hold the “shift” + “command” + “A” keys on your Mac keyboard, or “SHIFT” + “CTRL” + “A” on your PC, to access this menu.

3. This will bring you to a settings page. Click “Extensions” on the left hand side, and you’ll find a list of enabled add-ons under the “Manage Your Extensions” section. Click on “Block Site.”

4. On the next page, click the three dots.

5. Click “Preferences.”

6. This will open an options page for Block Site in a new tab. Though there are lots of options, you really only need to focus on a few sections. It’s not necessary to do, but you can also follow the prompts provided to change settings like the user message, how long before a blocked tab closes, or time and day limitations for blocked sites.

7. You can add a master password at the top, so you can view a blocked site if needed.

8. You can also add a site under “Redirect to.” For example, a blocked site will always redirect to Google or the Firefox homepage.

9. After you’ve made any changes, enter the site’s URL in the “Block a new hostname” space.

10. Click “Add.”

The blocked site should appear under the “Matching Pattern” section. You also have the option to add a “Redirect to” site here.

You can remove a site at any time in this section as well.

Now, when you try to access that site, you will receive a blocked message. Enter the master password, if you set one, to temporarily unblock the site, if needed.

A customizable, password-protected website blocker and redirector.

Extension Metadata

Used by

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

This extension will block access to websites of your choosing. A master password controls all customization options, as well as access to any blocked site. It’s also possible to redirect navigation from one specific website to another.

Features:
1. Block unwanted domains.
2. Prevent access to a range of websites using wildcard matching or regular expression matching.
3. Reverse mode allows access to only some hostnames and blocks access to all others.
4. Custom redirection; you can redirect a single blocked hostname to a new destination.
5. Display a custom message on blocked pages.
6. Time and date based blocking. Only block access to the websites at specified times and dates. This feature can be configured per hostname.
7. Protect data leakage. This extension prevents certain hostnames from gathering network activity from your computer, since blocking occurs before any network request is emitted to the server.
8. Auto-closes blocked tabs after a period of time.
10. Closes annoying pop-ups as soon as the opening request is received.
11. Pause and resume blocking from the right-click context menu of the toolbar button.
12. Supports overwriting configurations by managed storage

For the FAQs and general feature suggestions please use:
https://add0n.com/block-site.html

Report this add-on for abuse

If you think this add-on violates Mozilla’s add-on policies or has security or privacy issues, please report these issues to Mozilla using this form.

Please don’t use this form to report bugs or request add-on features; this report will be sent to Mozilla and not to the add-on developer.

The developer of this extension asks that you help support its continued development by making a small contribution.

This add-on needs to:

  • Display notifications to you
  • Access your data for all websites

Share This Article

Dig Deeper
Social Profile
Best Picks
  • 8 Best Forex Trading Courses in 2022
  • 9 Best Forex Training Coaches In The World
  • 9 Best Cryptocurrency Trading Course in 2022
  • Options Trading Course: 7 Well-Structured Courses Reviewed [2022]!
  • 7 Best Forex Brokers in 2022 • In-depth Review
Getting Started With Forex
  • 8 Best Forex Trading Courses In 2022
  • 7 Best Forex Brokers in 2022 • Indepth Review
  • 5 Best Forex Trading Software in 2022: A Guide to Stop Losing Money
Best Banking Accounts
  • 11 Best Savings Account • Top Savings Account in Last Quarter of 2022
  • 9 Best High Yield Savings Account of 2022
  • 11 Best CD Rates of 2022
  • Best Money Market Accounts of 2022
  • 9 Best Online Checking Account of 2022
  • 11 Best National Banks For Savings and Checking Account
  • 11 Best Credit Unions of 2022
  • Best Banking Apps of 2022
  • Online Banking Guide for Beginners
  • 9 Best High Yield Savings Account of 2022
More on Loans
  • Best Personal Loan of 2022
  • Best Low-Interest Personal Loans of 2022
  • Best Personal Loans for Bad Credit of 2022
  • Best Personal Loans for Excellent Credit of 2022
  • Best Debt Consolidation Loans of 2022
  • Best Student Loans of 2022
  • Best Private Student Loans of 2022
  • Best Student Loans for Bad Credit of 2022
  • Best Student Loan Refinance of 2022
  • Best Auto Loan of 2022
  • How to Block Websites in Mozilla Firefox
  • Best Home Improvement Loans of 2022
  • Best Installment Loans of 2022
  • Best Emergency Loans of 2022
Loan Reviews
  • Cashusa.com Reviews: Compare Top Personal Loans of 2022
  • 100Lenders.com Reviews: Compare Top Lenders of 2022
  • PersonalLoans com Reviews: Compare Top Lenders of 2022
  • BadCreditLoans.com Reviews • Personal Loan For Low-Credit
Best Of Health
  • 9 Best Hair Growth Supplements and Vitamins in 2022
  • 11 Best Fat Burner Supplements for Belly Fat in 2022
  • 5 Best Eye Vitamins and Supplements in 2022 • All Natural Supplements
  • 5 Best Memory Supplements in 2022 • Natural Pills and Program
  • 5 Best Supplements for Tinnitus • Top Ear Ringing Relief Products of 2022
  • 5 Best Joint Pain Supplements of 2022 • Natural Joint Pain Solution
  • 7 Best Lower Back Pain Treatment • Top Back Pain Relief of 2022
  • 7 Best Testosterone Booster Supplements in 2022 • All Natural Supplements
More on Stocks
  • 7 Best Stock Brokers: Top Stock Brokers Review of 2022
  • 3 Best Online Brokers for Stocks Under $100 in 2022
  • 5 Best Online Brokers for ETF Investing in 2022
  • 3 Best Brokers for Mutual Funds in 2022
  • Best Blue Chip Stocks: How and Where to Invest in 2022
  • Best Swing Trade Stocks: Tips on What and Where to do Swing Trade 2022
Learn About Cryptocurrency
  • Investing In Cryptocurrency: 8 Things A Beginner Should Know
  • How to Trade Cryptocurrency? A Traders Beginners Guide 2022
  • 9 Best Cryptocurrency Trading Course in 2022
  • 5 Best Crypto Trading Bots of 2022 In Depth Review
  • 7 Best Crypto Portfolio Trackers In Depth Review of 2022
  • Best Cryptocurrencies in 2022: A Review of What’s Hot and What’s Not
  • 7 Best Cryptocurrency Brokers: Top Cryptocurrency Brokers Review of 2022
Review
  • AvaTrade Review: Is it the Best Overall Broker?
  • Forex.com Review: Is it the Best for Social Traders in 2022?

Search Who You’re Dating Online

Search everything about the person you are dating.

Recommended Hookup Site

Find hookups near you. State-of-the art scam protection measures.

Though the idea of slowing the websites you prefer, should Net Neutrality fail in congress, is not a good thing, the ability to control which websites will be viewable on your browser is. This may be done for many reasons. If you have kids, you may want to limit their ability to watch salacious material or violence. If you work at home, you may want to limit your ability to go onto websites that are a personal “time suck”, such as Pinterest, Facebook, YouTube, and online shopping sites. Depending on your needs, there is a way to completely block these sites, password-protect them, and even to block these sites during certain hours to keep you from using them when you are supposed to be working on something else. Here are the two main ways to block sites on Mozilla Firefox:

1. Parental Controls:

Parental controls are a great way to block sites for kids, and many of them come with the additional ability of blocking sites you don’t know about in order to give better protection. Mozilla has a few free add-on versions that can be found at https://addons.mozilla.org/. Windows 7 has a program called Family Safety that you can enable for free on any computer. There are a number of versions for purchase as well, depending on your needs. When choosing the right parental blocking site, here are a few tips to ask yourself:

  • Am I blocking a specific website that I know, or a type of website?
  • Do I want things permanently blocked, or just for a number of hours?
  • Do I want a record of sites that my kids are visiting to ensure that they are safe?
  • Do I want a transcript of chat text kept?

These answers will help you to decide the right program for your family.

2. Add-Ons:

If you only want to block a site for a certain number of hours a day, say during working or homework hours, there are add-ons that will create a temporary time block window for the sites you designate. One such program is called Leechblock and is available through the add-on store at Mozilla.

  • Go to the loading site for this program, found at https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/leechblock/
  • Click the button that says “Add to Firefox”
  • Enter the sites and hours that you would like to block.

You can go back to the add-on settings at any time and upgrade new hours, new programs, or other tweaks to the program so that you can get the most out of it.

Like this Article? Subscribe to Our Feed!

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Author: Jay White

I started Dumb Little Man so great authors, writers and bloggers could share their life “hacks” and tips for success with everyone. I hope you find something you like!

Dave Hyatt and Blake Ross created the project Moilla Firefox. It was done as an experiment in that branch. You have different versions in Firefox, like version1.0, version1.5, version2.0, version3.0 and version3.5. The Firefox retains the original cross-platform of the Mozilla browser. It retains the cross-platform using the XUL user interface markup language. Due to the XUL it is possible to extend the browser’s capacity through the use of extensions and themes.

Mozilla Firefox has Adblock. Adblock is a content filter extension. This Adblock is for Mozilla Firefox and Mozila application Suite based web browsers. This Adblock is mainly used to block advertisements. It also lets users to prevent page elements from being downloaded and displayed. An improved version of the Adblock of Mozilla Firefox is Adblock Plus. Adblock Plus has grown to replace the old Adblock. There are many improved features in the Mozilla Firefox Ad blocker, to filter subscriptions, user interface and element hiding.

This Adblock was developed by Henrik Aasted Sorensen, Michael McDonald and Wladimir Palant. The first 1.1 version was released in July 13, 2009. It works in the Cross-platform operating system. Its type is Mozilla extension. With many features added Adblock focuses on the usability. At the top of the main window it has menu items. From its panel at the bottom, which has a list of block able items is integrated. This panel can be detached from the main window. Addition to the regular ad blocking Element Hiding can be also used. There are many other features in the Adblock. It helps to enable and disable individual filters without even removing them. It also has the feature which includes filter statistics which hits counter.

Mozilla has a built-in image blocker like that, Adblock blocks HTTP requests. It blocks according to their source address and can block I Frames, scripts and Flash. It also does element hiding. That is it uses automatically-generated user style sheets to hide elements, elements such as text ads on a page as they load instead of blocking them.

BlockSite is an extension, which automatically blocks websites of your choice. Additionally, this extension will disable all hyperlinks to these websites, by just displaying the link text without the clicking functionality.

Extension Metadata

Used by

How to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxHow to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxHow to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxHow to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Stay focused and improve productivity. Easily block any distracting or harmful website. Stop procrastination once and for all!

Simply Block Websites – No willpower necessary

Create Block Lists
Add the websites or pages you want to block in a smart and simple way. Get automatically redirected to safer, more positive sites. Build a more effective work environment for yourself

Bulk Adult block
All adult sites can now be blocked with a single click.

Control Your Browsing
Set up the sites you want to be redirected to. Make sure your internet usage is productive and effective. Block social media sites, adult content, or other sites you find disturbing.

Improve Productivity
Right click anywhere on any website to open the quick access menu. Block sites in seconds to avoid procrastination and stay on target.

Block by Keywords
Block sites and search queries on search engines like Google or Bing, based on specific words. Make sure you choose what to block wisely, so Keyword Block will only stop the sites and pages you’re not interested in.

Keep Your Kids’ Internet Safe
Activate “Adult related” keyword block to filter out all predefined bad words and profanities. Highly recommended for parents with young children.

Block For Specific Times
Choose days and intervals in which you want Block site to be active. Set up custom blocks based on your work schedule (for example: 09:00 – 17:00), so you won’t procrastinate during the day, when at work or at school.

Switch Between Blacklists & Whitelists
Create a list of friendly sites, and switch from blocking specific sites to only allowing certain sites to work.

Help Us Create a Better Internet
Anonymously share statistics to help us monitor harmful and time-wasting sites. All stats are completely anonymous.

Questions? We’re Here.
If you have any questions regarding the functionality or you would like to put a feature request, please do it via email: [email protected]

Block Site is a browser extension that allows you to block specific sites based on parameters you define. As part of our service, Block Site maintains and updates a database of known sites with adult content. Each URL you visit is checked against this database, in case you want to block adult content. Additionally, Block Site receives and analyzes data about visited sites. The data collected includes: visited URLs, your IP address, your operating system and the browser you are using, and the time stamp. For more information, see our privacy policy: https://blocksite.co/privacy/

Your privacy is important to us. The data collected is not used to identify individual users. In addition, the data collected is not shared with any third parties for the purposes of marketing or targeting individual users. You can always opt out from data collection by deselecting the checkbox next to the words “Block Adult Sites” which can be found under the Settings tab of the Options page. Note that once you opt out, some of the services provided by BlockSite will no longer be available.

Unfortunately Noel Briggs wasn’t able to co-maintain this add-on, so I took over again. Please donate if you would like to see BlockSite updated regularly.

2010/02/01: The first donation pledge of $50 was reached in less than two weeks. Thanks to all who’ve donated. I will be working on a major update (with probably much faster execution and certainly with less bugs). This can take a while, so don’t worry if you will not see the major update shortly.

2010/02/12: I’ve been working on the long awaited update for a few days now. Unfortunately it needs complete restructuring with completely new code, because most of it buggy or just plain old. Thanks to all who have donated so far.

Report this add-on for abuse

If you think this add-on violates Mozilla’s add-on policies or has security or privacy issues, please report these issues to Mozilla using this form.

Please don’t use this form to report bugs or request add-on features; this report will be sent to Mozilla and not to the add-on developer.

This add-on needs to:

  • Display notifications to you
  • Access browser tabs
  • Store unlimited amount of client-side data
  • Access browser activity during navigation
  • Access your data for all websites

Search Support

  1. Home
  2. Support Forums
  3. Firefox
  4. how to unblock websites that are blocked

Avoid support scams. We will never ask you to call or text a phone number or share personal information. Please report suspicious activity using the “Report Abuse” option.

Learn More

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

how to unblock websites that are blocked

  • 11 replies
  • 1386 have this problem
  • 1515 views
  • Last reply by HELPER123321

how can i unblock websites that i have blocked..i went to the folder and found the block list not sure how to delete them..i have tried but there is no delete button

This happened

A few times a week

Chosen solution

I blocked images by accident on one of the website that I use and now I can open the site but can’t see images and some of the text, how can I unbock this.

Thank yuo Helen protasova

All Replies (11)

Chosen Solution

I blocked images by accident on one of the website that I use and now I can open the site but can’t see images and some of the text, how can I unbock this.

Thank yuo Helen protasova

how can i unblock what i did. i have been threw every setting in Firefox, and i cant get it. can someone help thanks.

i had the same problem, on facebook to be more precise. i accidentally right-clicked something, n my profile pic was blocked. i fiddled wit some buttons n i managed to solve d problem. SOLUTION: GO TO THE WEBSITE WHERE U EXPERIENCED THE PROBLEM OF BLOCKED IMAGES; CLICK ON “TOOLS” ABOVE THE ADDRESS BAR, AND SELECT/CLICK “PAGE INFO”. U WILL SEE 4 TABS: GENERAL, MEDIA, PERMISSIONS N SECURITY; CLICK ON “MEDIA”. ON THE MEDIA TAB, U WILL SEE ADDRESS AND TYPE, N LINKS BELOW. KEEP CLICKING ON THE LINKS, “THE MEDIA PREVIEW” WILL SHOW U THE IMAGES AS U CLICK THE LINKS ONE BY ONE, UNTIL U FIND THE BLOCKED IMAGE(S), THEN “UN-CHECK BLOCK IMAGES”.

THANKS N GOODLUCK.

Modified August 16, 2010 at 5:58:14 AM PDT by foxchik

It didn’t work for me. I blocked a movie at oldjewstellingjokes.com and can’t get the movies back. When I go to page info, no flash vids or other vids show up. Any ideas how to fix this? I even replace Firefox with an archived version and still no go. Is there a preference that I can delete?

@jinkywells: the Media tab shows ALL images and media in the page, even the ones you blocked. Click on the movie in the top of the info page, THEN unblock it.

Tìm kiếm hỗ trợ

  1. Trang chủ
  2. Diễn đàn hỗ trợ
  3. Firefox
  4. How to I block the unwanted.

Tránh các lừa đảo về hỗ trợ. Chúng tôi sẽ không bao giờ yêu cầu bạn gọi hoặc nhắn tin đến số điện thoại hoặc chia sẻ thông tin cá nhân. Vui lòng báo cáo hoạt động đáng ngờ bằng cách sử dụng tùy chọn “Báo cáo lạm dụng”.

Learn More

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

How to I block the unwanted Mozilla.org page that loads before my homepage. Using Firefox 18.0

  • 4 trả lời
  • 3 gặp vấn đề này
  • 1 lượt xem
  • Trả lời mới nhất được viết bởi Tom Ryan

When I open Firefox 18.0, instead of my homepage, I get an unwanted page from Mozill.org. Using Options/General tab/ I have show my homepage selected. I can get the URL fore my homepage entered in the Home page blank, but it will not hold. If I close FireFox and restart I still get the unwanted Mozilla.org page

Giải pháp được chọn

You may have a problem with the preferences.

Tất cả các câu trả lời (4)

  • What is the page you are seeing ?
    • what is the full URL
    • and can you also take and attach a screenshot:
      • How do I create a screenshot of my problem?

Have you checked the settings for your homepage. Are these altering after you have set them ?

Have you any security or backup software installed that is likely to lock or restore Firefox settings rather than allow you to make changed ?

Sorry for the delay. Attached are two ScreenPrints. ScreenPrint 1 is the page that loads when I open FireFox. ScreenPrint 2 shows the homepage that should be loading.

Both pages load, but on different tabs, with #1 loading ahead of # 2, when, in fact, #1 should not be loading at all.

I’m using Microsoft Security Essentials on a Widows 7 box

Mahesh Makvana is a freelance tech writer who specializes in writing how-to guides. He has been writing tech tutorials for over a decade now. He’s written for some of the prominent tech sites including MakeUseOf, MakeTechEasier, and Online Tech Tips. Read more.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Mozilla Firefox blocks any pop-ups on your websites by default. If you’d like it to show those pop-ups, you will have to disable the built-in pop-up blocker first. We’ll show you how to do that in Firefox on desktop, iPhone, and iPad.

Note: Firefox’s Android app does not have a pop-up blocker, which means you do not have to do anything to enable pop-ups. They are already enabled.

Disable Pop-Up Blocker in Firefox on Desktop

To turn off the pop-up blocker in Firefox on your Windows, Mac, Linux, or Chromebook computer, first, launch Firefox on your computer.

In Firefox’s top-right corner, click the three horizontal lines.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

From the menu that opens, select “Settings.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

On the settings page, in the left sidebar, click “Privacy & Security.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

On the right pane, scroll down to the “Permissions” section. Here, at the bottom, disable the “Block Pop-Up Windows” option.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

And that’s it. You have successfully turned off Firefox’s built-in pop-up blocker. Any site can now show pop-up windows when you visit them.

Allow Pop-Ups for Specific Websites on Firefox

One good thing about Firefox is that you can enable pop-ups for specific sites while blocking them on all other sites. If you’d like to do this, then next to the “Block Pop-Up Windows” option (this option must be enabled), click “Exceptions.” On the “Allowed Websites – Pop-Ups” window that opens, type the full address of the site where you want to enable pop-ups, click “Allow,” and then click “Save Changes.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Firefox will now allow pop-ups from your specified sites while blocking them on all other sites. Enjoy!

If you use Chrome alongside Firefox, you can disable the pop-up blocker in Chrome, too.

Disable Pop-Up Blocker in Firefox on iPhone and iPad

To allow websites to show pop-ups in Firefox on your iPhone or iPad, first, open Firefox on your phone.

In Firefox’s bottom-right corner, tap the three horizontal lines.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

From the menu that opens, select “Settings.”

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

On the “Settings” page, scroll down and toggle off the “Block Pop-Up Windows” option.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Firefox on your iPhone or iPad will no longer block any pop-up windows. You are all set.

While using Firefox, do you get annoyed by those search suggestions that appear as soon as you start typing in the address bar? Luckily, you can disable those suggestions and cut that annoyance out of your life.

Mozilla Firefox is a popular browser with many fantastic features and extensions. Many people choose to use Firefox for its privacy and security options. That’s why it can be so disheartening when websites try to co-opt the browser and open automatically at startup.
As a general rule, websites and apps should never automatically configure themselves to startup without explicit user consent. However, certain apps and websites don’t always follow that guideline.

This article will explain how to stop websites from automatically opening on startup and give you control of your browser again.

Regaining Control of Firefox’s Startup

The startup behavior of Firefox typically is managed through the preferences window. In rare instances where a rogue browser extension or other malware has hijacked the browser, this isn’t always possible.

Here we will outline the simplest way to change Firefox’s startup and then touch on the more advanced methods, should the need arise.

Using the Preferences Interface

The quickest way to change which websites load at startup is by using the Home panel in Firefox’s Preferences window. Often, when a website loads unexpectedly, you will find that some app or program has changed this setting without permission. Follow these steps to check the current value, and change it if necessary:
• Click the Firefox Menu button (?) and then select Preferences.

• On the left-hand side of the screen, click the Home category.

• You will see your home page’s options on the right-side panel for both New windows and New tabs. Verify that these settings are correct.

• If the settings are not correct, you can use the drop-down lists and buttons to change them. Options include the current page, a bookmark, a blank page, or Restore Defaults in the upper-right.

• Once you have set your desired home page, restart Firefox to confirm your settings work as expected.

Newer versions of Firefox will also indicate if a particular Extension is controlling these settings. If so, you will have the option to disable the appropriate extension by clicking the Disable Extension button.

Editing Preferences Manually

If the preferences pane is not functioning correctly for some reason, or you’re experiencing other issues, the Preferences Editor is your next step.

You need to be a bit more cautious using the Preferences Editor, as it has a lot of power, but it’s not too difficult.

• With Firefox open, type about:config into the address bar.

• A warning message will be displayed. Note the warning and then click I Accept the Risk.

• In the search field at the top of the editor window, enter browser.startup.homepage

• Check the value of the record displayed in the result. If needed, you can right-click the value and select the option to reset the value to default.

• When you are finished, close the tab or window that has the preferences editor open. On the next restart of Firefox, your startup page should now function correctly.

Toolbars Could be the Culprit

If neither of the above options was successful, the possibility of add-ons causing the issue is more likely. The most common Firefox add-ons that cause problems are toolbars. While some toolbars provide useful features, others can be adware, spyware, or malware. If you suspect a toolbar has hijacked your Firefox startup, follow these steps:

• Click the Firefox Menu button (?) and then select Add-ons followed by Extensions.

• One-by-one, select each toolbar in the list and click the Remove button.

• If Firefox needs to restart to complete the toolbar’s removal, you will be prompted to do so. Make sure any open tabs do not currently have vital information or work in them before restarting.

• Certain toolbars that can not be removed immediately may need to be disabled using the Disable button. After disabling them, you should then be able to remove them after restarting Firefox.

• Restart Firefox to check the startup behavior.

Start the Way You Want

It’s disconcerting for an extension to alter your web browser’s core behavior, but with these steps, you should be back in control. Along with startup security, another critical area of your browser is JavaScript.

Starting with Firefox 23, Firefox blocks active mixed content by default. This follows a practice adopted by Internet Explorer (since version 9) and Chrome.

This page explains what you should be aware of as a web developer.

Your website may break

If your website delivers HTTPS pages, all active mixed content delivered via HTTP on this pages will be blocked by default. Consequently, your website may appear broken to users (if iframes or plugins don’t load, etc.). Passive mixed content is displayed by default, but users can set a preference to block this type of content, as well.

Note that since mixed content blocking already happens in Chrome and Internet Explorer, it is very likely that if your website works in both of these browsers, it will work equally well in Firefox with mixed content blocking.

In any case, the best way to know if something is broken in Firefox is to download the latest Firefox Edition, open different pages on your website with the web console open (enable the “Security” messages) and see if anything related to mixed content is reported. Or use a free online crawler like SSL-check or Missing Padlock, a desktop crawler like HTTPSChecker, or a CLI tool like mcdetect to check your website recursively and find links to insecure content. If nothing is said about mixed content, your website is in good shape: Keep making excellent websites!

How to fix your website

The best strategy to avoid mixed content blocking is to serve all the content as HTTPS instead of HTTP.

For your own domain, serve all content as HTTPS and fix your links. Often, the HTTPS version of the content already exists and this just requires adding an “s” to links – http:// to https://.

However, in some cases, the path may just be incorrect to the media in question. There are online as well as offline tools (depending on your operating system) such as linkchecker to help resolve this.

For other domains, use the site’s HTTPS version if available. If HTTPS is not available, you can try contacting the domain and asking them if they can make the content available via HTTPS.

Found a problem with this page?

  • Edit on GitHub
  • Source on GitHub
  • Report a problem with this content on GitHub
  • Want to fix the problem yourself? See our Contribution guide.

Last modified: Sep 13, 2022 , by MDN contributors

In Firefox, how do I do the equivalent of –disable-web-security in Chrome. This has been posted a lot, but never a true answer. Most are links to add-ons (some of which don’t work in the latest Firefox or don’t work at all) and “you just need to enable support on the server”.

  1. This is temporary to test. I know the security implications.
  2. I can’t turn on CORS on the server and I especially would never be able to allow localhost or similar.
  3. A flag, or setting, or something would be a lot better than a plugin. I also tried: http://www-jo.se/f.pfleger/forcecors, but something must be wrong since my requests come back as completely empty, but same requests in Chrome come back fine.

Again, this is only for testing before pushing to prod which, then, would be on an allowable domain.

  • security
  • firefox
  • cross-domain
  • cors

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

9 Answers 9

Trending sort is based off of the default sorting method — by highest score — but it boosts votes that have happened recently, helping to surface more up-to-date answers.

It falls back to sorting by highest score if no posts are trending.

Switch to Trending sort

Almost everywhere you look, people refer to the about:config and the security.fileuri.strict_origin_policy. Sometimes also the network.http.refere.XOriginPolicy.

For me, none of these seem to have any effect.

This comment implies there is no built-in way in Firefox to do this (as of 2/8/14).

From this answer I’ve known a CORS Everywhere Firefox extension and it works for me. It creates MITM proxy intercepting headers to disable CORS. You can find the extension at addons.mozilla.org or here.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Check out my addon that works with the latest Firefox version, with beautiful UI and support JS regex: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/cross-domain-cors

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

The Chrome setting you refer to is to disable the same origin policy.

This was covered in this thread also: Disable firefox same origin policy

about:config -> security.fileuri.strict_origin_policy -> false

I have not been able to find a Firefox option equivalent of –disable-web-security or an addon that does that for me. I really needed it for some testing scenarios where modifying the web server was not possible. What did help was to use Fiddler to auto-modify web responses so that they have the correct headers and CORS is no longer an issue.

If on https go to menu Tools -> Options -> Https and tick the Capture & Decrypt https options

Go to menu Rules -> Customize rules. Modify the OnBeforeResponseFunction so that it looks like the following, then save:

This will make every web response to have the Access-Control-Allow-Origin: * header.

Cookies are a valuable way to improve the web browsing experience. They do important things such as remembering preferences and login information. However, other sites may use cookie to track you or to record your browsing habits. This tech-recipe describes how to block or allow cookies for one specific page or website.

To block cookies:

1. Launch Firefox and go to the website you want to block cookies.

2. Go to Tools->Page info.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

3. In the Page info window, switch to Permissions tab and head to Set Cookies section.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

4. Uncheck Use Default and then choose Block. That’s it. You have blocked cookies from that website.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

To renable cookies:

Option 1:

1. Launch Firefox and go to the website that have been blocked from setting cookies.

2. Go to Tools->Page info.

3. In the Page info window, switch to Permissions tab and check on Use Default in Set Cookies section.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Option 2:

1. Launch Firefox and go to Tools->Options.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

2. Switch to Privacy tab, set Firefox will: to Use custom settings for history.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

3. Click on Exceptions… in the same tab.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

4.Choose the website you want to renable cookies from the list, choose Remove Site and hit Close to close the window.

Twitter LinkedIn icon The word “in”.

LinkedIn Fliboard icon A stylized letter F.

Flipboard Facebook Icon The letter F.

Email Link icon An image of a chain link. It symobilizes a website link url.

  • You can allow pop-ups on Firefox for certain websites by navigating through your browser’s Preferences menu.
  • Mozilla’s Firefox browser comes pre-packaged with a very effective pop-up blocker, which can sometimes hinder certain websites from working correctly.
  • If you want to allow all pop-ups at once, you can also turn off Firefox’s pop-up blocker altogether.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Pop-ups are one of the most bothersome parts of the online world.

So, the fact that Mozilla’s Firefox browser comes pre-packed with a pop-up blocker — no extensions necessary — is a great perk.

But, there are also times when you actually want to allow a pop-up to see the light of day.

For instance, when watching sports online, videos are often presented on a smaller, pop-out window — a window that may get blocked by Firefox’s overzealous pop-up blocker.

Fortunately, you can selectively let pop-ups sneak by on certain websites without disabling Firefox’s otherwise advantageous pop-up blocking tool.

Here’s how to allow pop-ups on Firefox for certain websites, using your Mac or PC.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

Apple Macbook Pro (From $1299.00 at Apple)

Lenovo IdeaPad 130 (From $469.99 at Walmart)

How to allow pop-ups on Firefox

1. Open a new Firefox window or new tab by clicking the “+” sign next to an open tab or tabs on your Mac or PC.

2. Click the gear icon in the top-right corner of the tab, which will direct you to your Preferences.

3. Once you’re in Preferences, click the three vertical lines in the top-left and select “Privacy & Security” from the options.

4. Scroll to the “Permissions” section, near the bottom of the page.

5. By default, the “Block pop-up windows” box will be checked. Leave the box checked, but click “Exceptions…” You can also uncheck this box to turn off the pop-up blocker altogether.

6. Type in the address of the website that you want to allow pop-ups for, then click “Allow.”

7. Finally, click “Save Changes.”

The website should immediately appear under “Website” with the status “Allow” in Firefox’s “Allowed Websites – Pop-ups” window.

If pop-ups from an exempted website become bothersome and you’d like to change your mind, you can always remove the website in the same Preferences page.

Today, Firefox on desktop and Android will — by default — empower and protect all our users by blocking third-party tracking cookies and cryptominers. This milestone marks a major step in our multi-year effort to bring stronger, usable privacy protections to everyone using Firefox.

Firefox’s Enhanced Tracking Protection gives users more control

For today’s release, Enhanced Tracking Protection will automatically be turned on by default for all users worldwide as part of the ‘Standard’ setting in the Firefox browser and will block known “third-party tracking cookies” according to the Disconnect list. We first enabled this default feature for new users in June 2019. As part of this journey we rigorously tested, refined, and ultimately landed on a new approach to anti-tracking that is core to delivering on our promise of privacy and security as central aspects of your Firefox experience.

Currently over 20% of Firefox users have Enhanced Tracking Protection on. With today’s release, we expect to provide protection for 100% of ours users by default. Enhanced Tracking Protection works behind-the-scenes to keep a company from forming a profile of you based on their tracking of your browsing behavior across websites — often without your knowledge or consent. Those profiles and the information they contain may then be sold and used for purposes you never knew or intended. Enhanced Tracking Protection helps to mitigate this threat and puts you back in control of your online experience.

You’ll know when Enhanced Tracking Protection is working when you visit a site and see a shield icon in the address bar:

When you see the shield icon, you should feel safe that Firefox is blocking thousands of companies from your online activity.

For those who want to see which companies we block, you can click on the shield icon, go to the Content Blocking section, then Cookies. It should read Blocking Tracking Cookies. Then, click on the arrow on the right hand side, and you’ll see the companies listed as third party cookies that Firefox has blocked:

How to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxHow to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

If you want to turn off blocking for a specific site, click on the Turn off Blocking for this Site button.

Protecting users’ privacy beyond tracking cookies

Cookies are not the only entities that follow you around on the web, trying to use what’s yours without your knowledge or consent. Cryptominers, for example, access your computer’s CPU, ultimately slowing it down and draining your battery, in order to generate cryptocurrency — not for yours but someone else’s benefit. We introduced the option to block cryptominers in previous versions of Firefox Nightly and Beta and are including it in the ‘Standard Mode‘ of your Content Blocking preferences as of today.

Another type of script that you may not want to run in your browser are Fingerprinting scripts. They harvest a snapshot of your computer’s configuration when you visit a website. The snapshot can then also be used to track you across the web, an issue that has been present for years. To get protection from fingerprinting scripts Firefox users can turn on ‘Strict Mode.’ In a future release, we plan to turn fingerprinting protections on by default.

Also in today’s Firefox release

To see what else is new or what we’ve changed in today’s release, you can check out our release notes.

Check out and download the latest version of Firefox available here.

How to block the sex sites??

Posted May 22nd, 2005, 3:12 pm

Hey, i want to block the sex sites/searches in my firefox..

can some one help me that how can i do that or does it is a plugin that block this kind of sites..

Posted May 22nd, 2005, 3:23 pm

Nope. Google has settings for safe search/moderately safe search/whatever the third category is – if you just don’t want to get porn in your searches.

If you mean how do you stop your kids viewing porn, this thread has some useful suggestions (and warnings) http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewtopic.php?t=257439

daylight/ – Xmas special by Ol Grumpy

Posted February 15th, 2009, 11:29 am

hellene wrote: Nope. Google has settings for safe search/moderately safe search/whatever the third category is – if you just don’t want to get porn in your searches.

If you mean how do you stop your kids viewing porn, this thread has some useful suggestions (and warnings) http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewtopic.php?t=257439

Posted February 15th, 2009, 11:35 am

Please start a new topic for your Question.

Also try using a Kid Friendly Search Engine.

Locking this, as this is a very old topic.

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the former. -Albert Einstein

Please DO NOT PM me for support . Lets keep it on the board, so we can all learn.

Last year, we introduced Firefox Focus, a new browser for the iPhone and iPad, designed to be fast, simple and always private. A lot has happened since November; and more than ever before, we’re seeing consumers play an active role in trying to protect their personal data and save valuable megabytes on their data plans.

While we knew that Focus provided a useful service for those times when you want to keep your web browsing to yourself, we were floored by your response – it’s the highest rated browser from a trusted brand for the iPhone and iPad, earning a 4.6 average rating on the App Store.

Today, I’m thrilled to announce that we’re launching our Firefox Focus mobile app for Android.

Like the iPhone and iPad version, the Android app is free of tabs and other visual clutter, and erasing your sessions is as easy as a simple tap. Firefox Focus allows you to browse the web without being followed by tracking ads which are notoriously known for slowing down your mobile experience. Why do we block these ad trackers? Because they not only track your behavior without your knowledge, they also slow down the web on your mobile device.

Check out this video to learn more:

New Features for Android

For the Android release of Firefox Focus, we added the following features:

  • Ad tracker counter – For the curious, there’s a counter to list the number of ads that are blocked per site while using the app.
  • Disable tracker blocker – For sites that are not loading correctly, you can disable the tracker blocker to quickly take care of it and get back to where you’ve left off.
  • Notification reminder – When Focus is running in the background, we’ll remind you through a notification and you can easily tap to erase your browsing history.

For Android users we also made Focus a great default browser experience. Since we support both custom tabs and the ability to disable the ad blocking as needed, it works great with apps like Facebook when you just want to read an article without being tracked. We built Focus to empower you on the mobile web, and we will continue to introduce new features that make our products even better. Thanks for using Firefox Focus for a faster and more private mobile browsing experience.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla FirefoxFirefox Focus Settings View

You can download Firefox Focus on Google Play and in the App Store.

Introducing IRL: An Original Podcast From Mozilla

A $2 Million Prize to Decentralize the Web. Apply Today

How often do you find yourself scrolling through random websites and then, 3 hours later you’re yet to complete the task you needed to complete and feel like you failed. Well, the truth is, you’re not alone. Statistics show that procrastination affects over 20% of the population and that procrastination has more than quadrupled in the last 30 years.

Today, with technology being indispensable to everyday life, we need to make sure we put strict limits in place to control our screen time if we don’t want to waste time on distractions that we incur online every single day. These distractions can be anything from notifications on your phone when you’re trying to complete an assignment to an app alerting you that someone ‘liked’ your Instagram photo. Such distractions make it very hard for us to stay focused when our attention is being pulled elsewhere.

Similarly, while at work we all face distractions while completing daily tasks online. The tools themselves, that we use while working are also a source of distraction. Everything from Google alerting us about new calendar invitations to news websites pinging us with ‘breaking news’ updates and the general rearranging of browser tabs, meetings, and colleagues all which can interfere with your concentration and make you lose track and make your focus waver.

So what’s the solution? Here are some of the top ways you can block websites.

Stay connected with BlockSite

Get productivity tips and company updates.

How do I block a specific website?

Online blocking software has been proven to dramatically improve your focus and productivity.

Solutions such as BlockSite provide users with a straightforward and friendly way to free themselves from distractions online and enable them to know how to block a specific website.

For example, we’re all used to typing ‘f’ in the Google browser bar and having autofill complete ‘Facebook’ and send us straight there. But! Imagine if it could be blocked with the click of a button so that every time Google sends you to your favourite social media site, you’re blocked from viewing it. That would be great right? Well, now you can do this! Simply download BlockSite to your desktop and/or mobile and start adding websites that you want to block. You can also choose if you wish to stop accessing these sites permanently or by schedule. Download here to get started.

Can I block a specific website on my iPhone or Android?

The good news is that you can block a specific website on your iPhone and/or Android. The even better news is it’s really straightforward to do so.

With the BlockSite app, you can block specific websites as well as bulk block specific categories of websites. For example, let’s say the news headlines are getting a bit too much. You can choose to block only CNN.com or you can choose to block in bulk by category and then you can avoid all news outlets. The app is available on both iOS and Android and enables you to remove distractions while on the go.

What sites should I block?

The sites you should remove from your life should be reflective of those that waste the most of your time and stop you from being productive. It’s previously been reported that the average internet user spends approximately 6.5 hours a day online, which is a lot of time to get great work done, so long as it’s spent on the right websites.

Block tracking without the need for any extra steps

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Just like the majority of other advanced browsers on the market, including the likes of Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge, Mozilla Firefox comes with a private mode that makes it possible to browse the web without leaving any traces behind.

Simply called Private mode, this feature is the sibling of Incognito in Google Chrome, and it blocks the browser from saving any history or website data when closing the browser.

This feature comes in super-handy on several occasions, but it’s important to keep in mind that not all data is kept private. For example, the files that you download when browsing the web in private mode remains on your device, while certain information, like the IP address, can still be logged by the websites you visit.

But just like Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox doesn’t come with a straightforward option to always browse the web in Private mode. In other words, if you want this feature to be enabled 24/7, this isn’t possible unless you turn to the tricks mentioned below.

Basically, all you have to do is to tweak the launch parameters of Google Chrome in order to activate the Private mode on run. To do this, here are the steps you must follow.

First, create a shortcut of Firefox browser anywhere on your device – I recommended you to use the desktop for faster launching. Right-click the shortcut > Properties > Shortcut.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

In the Target field in this screen, you should find the following path if you installed Firefox at the default location:

“C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe”
Adding the -private parameter at the end of the path allows you to launch the browser with the Private mode enabled by the default. In other words, the Target field should look like this after making the changes:
“C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe” -private
Very important to know is that once you do this, you’ll have to switch to the standard browsing mode manually from within the browser. As an alternative, you can create different shortcuts for the private mode and for the standard browsing option, so you can launch whichever you want faster.

Mozilla also recommends users to enable two different features in Firefox if they don’t want to always enable the Private mode, but instead benefit from enhanced protection.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

One of them configures Mozilla Firefox to never remember history, which means that even if you’re using the standard browsing mode, no history information would be left behind. You can find this option at the following location:

Menu > Options > Privacy > Never Remember History
The latest versions of Firefox also come with further options for content blocking, so you can check them out as well. Learn more about the new content blockers in Firefox here.

And of course, if you want to avoid leaving any traces behind after a standard browsing session, you can just manually clean all the data from Firefox. Obviously, this isn’t the most convenient method since you need to perform the whole thing every time, but at least it’s possible.

To remove browsing, download, form, and search history, you need to reach the following location:

Menu > Options > Privacy > History > Clear History
Fortunately, even though Firefox doesn’t necessarily come with a straightforward method of setting up the Private mode by default, there are ways to enable it anyway, and this is one of the reasons this is one of the top browsers right now. As a side note, Firefox is currently the second most popular browser on the desktop, and it’s pretty much the only rival to Google Chrome.

You can now easily block a website in the Firefox browser.

There could be multiple reasons why you want to restrict access to certain websites. Maybe you want to block websites to avoid distractions, or just want to block malicious websites. Whatever might be the reason, you can easily block websites on your favorite web browser.

On techviral, we have already shared an article on how to block websites on Chrome. Today, we will be discussing the same for the Firefox browser.

Just like Chrome, you can install add-ons on Mozilla Firefox to enhance the browser functionalities. Similarly, there are Firefox add-ons available for blocking certain websites. With site blocker extensions, you can easily block any time consuming or annoying website.

Steps to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox Browser

So, in this article, we are going to share a working method to block a website in the Firefox web browser.

To block websites in Firefox, we are going to use the ‘Block Site’ extension. With this Firefox extension, one can easily block unwanted domains and prevent access to various websites. So, let’s check out how to use the Block Site extension in the Firefox browser.

Step 1. First of all, open this Block Site extension page and click on the ‘Add to Firefox’ button.

Step 2. In the next pop-up, click on the ‘Add’ button.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox Click on the ‘Add’ button

Step 3. Firefox will now display a success message, click on the ‘Okay, Got It’ button.

Step 4. Now enter ‘about:addons’ on the address bar.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox Enter ‘about:addons’ on the address bar

Step 5. The above URL will open the Add-on Manager on Firefox. From the left-hand side pane, select ‘Extensions’

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox Select ‘Extensions’

Step 6. Now, click on the ‘three dots’ near the Block site extension.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox Click on the ‘three dots’ near the Block site extension

Step 7. Select ‘Options’ in the menu that appears.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox Select ‘Options’

Step 8. On the next page, type in the website URL that you want to block and click on the ‘Add’ button.

Enter the URL and click on the ‘Add’ button

Step 9. Scroll down to the ‘Tools’ menu and click on the ‘Save’ button. You can also set up a master password to unlock the blocked website.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox Click on the Save button

Once done, whenever you will try to access the blocked site, you will see a screen like below.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox The blocked website

Other Extensions to Block Sites in Firefox

Just like the Block site, you can use other firefox extensions to block distracting sites. Check out the three best Firefox extensions to block sites in 2020.

1. Digital Detox

Well, Digital Detox is one of the best extensions to block websites in Firefox. The good thing is that it adds a toolbar button that lets you add websites to the block list. The extension also auto-restores tabs when blocking is disabled.

2. LeechBlock NG

It’s one of the best productivity extensions for Firefox that you can use today. With this extension, you can block all time-wasting sites. To block sites, you can create profiles. With each profile, you can block 30 websites, with different times and days for each set.

3. Impulse Blocker

With Impulse Blocker, you can easily block any website. To block any site with Impulse Blocker, you just need to visit any site and click on the extension icon. You would be asked to specify a time period, just set the time, and the site will be blocked. You can further explore the options page to add sites manually into the block list.

So, that’s all from us for today. With this Firefox extension, you can easily block any website. I hope this article helped you! Please share it with your friends also.

  • You can allow pop-ups on Firefox for certain websites by navigating through your browser’s Preferences menu.
  • Mozilla’s Firefox browser comes pre-packaged with a very effective pop-up blocker, which can sometimes hinder certain websites from working correctly.
  • If you want to allow all pop-ups at once, you can also turn off Firefox’s pop-up blocker altogether.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Pop-ups are one of the most bothersome parts of the online world.

So, the fact that Mozilla ‘s Firefox browser comes pre-packed with a pop-up blocker — no extensions necessary — is a great perk.

But, there are also times when you actually want to allow a pop-up to see the light of day.

Complimentary Tech Event

For instance, when watching sports online, videos are often presented on a smaller, pop-out window — a window that may get blocked by Firefox’s overzealous pop-up blocker.

Fortunately, you can selectively let pop-ups sneak by on certain websites without disabling Firefox’s otherwise advantageous pop-up blocking tool.

How to allow pop-ups on Firefox

1. Open a new Firefox window or new tab by clicking the “+” sign next to an open tab or tabs on your Mac or PC.

2. Click the gear icon in the top-right corner of the tab, which will direct you to your Preferences.

3. Once you’re in Preferences, click the three vertical lines in the top-left and select “Privacy & Security” from the options.

4. Scroll to the “Permissions” section, near the bottom of the page.

5. By default, the “Block pop-up windows” box will be checked. Leave the box checked, but click “Exceptions…” You can also uncheck this box to turn off the pop-up blocker altogether.

6. Type in the address of the website that you want to allow pop-ups for, then click “Allow.”

7. Finally, click “Save Changes.”

The website should immediately appear under “Website” with the status “Allow” in Firefox’s “Allowed Websites – Pop-ups” window.

If pop-ups from an exempted website become bothersome and you’d like to change your mind, you can always remove the website in the same Preferences page.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Mozilla Firefox is an open-source web browser that is used to access the data available on the World Wide Web. As compared to Internet Explorer, the popular Web browser Firefox provides users a simple user interface and faster download speeds. It uses the Gecko layout engine to translate web pages, which executes current and predicted web standards.

Firefox was widely used as an alternative to Internet Explorer 6.0 as it provided user protection against spyware and malicious websites. In the year of 2017, it was the fourth-most widely used web browser after Google Chrome, Apple Safari, and UC Browser.

The Firefox version 2.0 was released in October 2006. This latest version came with new features, such as:

  • It has a mail component that is called Thunderbird.
  • It provides a quick link to open the Google search engine.
  • It has the ability to search multiple search engines simultaneously.
  • It provides an efficient user interface.
  • It has improved tabbed browsing.
  • It offers new security features, including anti-phishing protection.

How to download Mozilla Firefox

It can be downloaded from the official Firefox website. It is available for Windows, Linux, macOS X, iOS, and Android operating systems. The Mozilla Firefox download link is given below:

Firefox Quantum

Mozilla introduced Firefox Quantum, a technical base, for the Firefox browser on 14 November 2017. All the recent Firefox versions, starting with the version 57, for desktop computers use Firefox Quantum technology. The mobile versions use the new appearance features code-named ‘Photon UI’.

It is almost twice as fast as the old versions of Firefox, as it needs less RAM at the time of browsing. It also offers enhanced thread safety, as its large sections were re-written by using Rust, which is Mozilla’s home-grown system programming language.

Advantages of Mozilla Firefox

  1. Easy Customization: The most important benefit of using Mozilla Firefox is its easy customization. It is available free to download and easily compatible with various devices. Furthermore, it is also able to integrate add-ons that can be used easily.
  2. Extensions and Themes: The Mozilla Firefox provides better support for browser extensions, themes, and plug-ins that, as per the user requirements, change the function and appearance of the browser. The Firefox included Add-ons library features with more than 6,000 extensions and more than 500 themes till June 2011. Extensions are useful to perform several tasks such as:
    • Providing access to your Facebook wall from the Firefox toolbar.
    • Alert you of breaking news to changing website elements with scripts.
    • Integrate the Firefox interface and much more.
  3. Security: Firefox gives importance for browser security by introducing various features that protect you from viruses, phishing schemes, and harmful sites. It has a powerful pop-up blocker and strong authentication protocols that help to stop an unauthorized person from running harmful code when you are using the browser. Additionally, Firefox security can be more enhanced with extensions like NoScript and FlashBlock that allow you to execute the selectively advanced code on websites.

Disadvantages of Mozilla Firefox

  1. Compatibility: The Mozilla Firefox is unable to compatible with some websites. For example, there are some business-oriented websites, which cannot be displayed properly in the Mozilla Firefox. It also affects system’s performance as it uses more memory to run properly. Thus, Mozilla Firefox is not more appropriate as compared to other browsers.
  2. Loading Time: The Mozilla Firefox takes more time for loading web pages as compared to its competitors. Also, the other browsers like Google Chrome and Opera have the ability to open in less time, whereas Mozilla Firefox is yet to improve in this respect. Furthermore, it provides multiple add-on features, which make the browser slower and hamper browsing speed.
  3. More Plug-ins: The more Plug-ins are also an issue with the Mozilla Firefox, which slow down the downloading of web pages.
  4. Non-Resuming Downloads: It is one of the most significant limitations of Mozilla Firefox. It does not have the feature to resume the downloading of a file from the point where the downloading has been interrupted. For example, if you are downloading a huge file from the internet and it gets interrupted in between due to any technical and network issue. Then, you have to download it from the start.

How to check version and update of Mozilla Firefox

Follow the steps given below to check the version of Firefox browser:

  • Open the Firefox browser.
  • Press the Alt key to access the menu bar as shown in the below image, then select Help option from the menu bar.
  • Now, select About Firefox option from the drop-down list. As shown in the below screenshot:
    How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox
  • Then, you will see a window that displays the version of Firefox that you are using. It will also check for updates automatically. If an update is required, you can click on the update button to install the latest version.
    How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

3Disabling images on your internet browser can help you improve and save on your bandwidth. This article will teach you how to disable images in Firefox browser.

If you are on a limited-internet plan or a pay-per-usage internet plan, you want to save bandwidth as much as you can. Less bandwidth usage equates to lesser internet fees. One of the bandwidth-extensive files are the images especially those that are set to high-resolution. These images can be as high as 10 MB. If the purpose of your browsing is only information and text-reading, then you can save on your bandwidth by disabling the display of images. After reading this tutorial, you will know how to disable images in Firefox, save on your bandwidth use, and have a faster browsing experience.

How to Disable Images in Firefox

You can configure Firefox to disable the display of images in Firefox browser by following the easy steps below:

1. Open your Firefox browser from the desktop.How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox
2. In Firefox’s browser address bar, type about:config and press Enter.How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox
3. Click on I’ll be careful, I promise! as shown in the screenshot below. Firefox can be playful and creative with the choice of words. Depending on your Firefox version, the button’s name can be different.How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox
4. In the search bar below the address bar, scroll down and search for permissions.default.image. You can see that the value of the integer is set to 1. The value 1 represents that the default display of images is enabled.How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox
5. Double click on the row of preference named permissions.default.image. Alternatively, you can also right-click the preference named permissions.default.image and click Modify to change the integer value.How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox
6. Change the integer value to 2 and click the OK button.How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox
7. Display of images in Firefox is now disabled.
To re-enable setting to load images automatically, repeat the same steps and change the value of permissions.default.image preference to 1.

Important Note:
Support values for permissions.default.image are:
1 – allows all images to load
2 – blocks all images
3 – allows only images from the same site to load and blocks third-party images

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: I would like to block images only from the advertisements and third-party cookies. How can I do that?
A: You can follow the same steps as above but instead of using the integer 2, use the integer 3 to allow images only from the site you are visiting and blocking any image from third-party sites and cookies.

Q: Will closing Firefox retain the settings on image display?
A: Closing Firefox and restarting your computer will save any changes you made to the program. If you chose to disable image display, images would still be disabled on your next Firefox session.

Q: WIll reinstalling and updating Firefox retain the settings on image display?
A: Reinstalling Firefox will set the settings back to default. All changes to the program, including the customization of image display, is removed and is set back to the default settings. Updating Firefox will retain your program’s settings including the integer for image display.

Q: I have changed the integer back to 1 to display images, but images on the site are still not shown. Can you help me on this?
A: You need to refresh the site to load the images. If reloading the website won’t work, try closing and opening Firefox. If all else fail, uninstall and install Firefox’s latest version.

You just learned how to disable images in Firefox. We hoped that this article helped you in saving costs, improving your bandwidth, and having a better Firefox browsing experience. If you have questions about any of the information in this article, let us know in the comments.

Sergiu Gatlan
  • October 25, 2021
  • 04:08 PM
  • 5

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Mozilla blocked malicious Firefox add-ons installed by roughly 455,000 users after discovering in early June that they were abusing the proxy API to block Firefox updates.

The add-ons (named Bypass and Bypass XM) were using the API to intercept and redirect web requests to block users from downloading updates, updating remotely configured content, and accessing updated blocklists.

“To prevent additional users from being impacted by new add-on submissions misusing the proxy API, we paused on approvals for add-ons that used the proxy API until fixes were available for all users,” Mozilla’s Rachel Tublitz and Stuart Colville said.

“Starting with Firefox 91.1, Firefox now includes changes to fall back to direct connections when Firefox makes an important request (such as those for updates) via a proxy configuration that fails.

“Ensuring these requests are completed successfully helps us deliver the latest important updates and protections to our users.”

To block similar malicious add-ons to abuse the same API, Mozilla has added a system add-on (hidden from the ‘about:addons’ UI, impossible to disable, and updateable restartlessly) dubbed Proxy Failover.

Firefox users can see if they have the Proxy Failover add-on installed by going to the ‘Firefox Features’ section on the ‘about:support’ page.

This new add-on prevents attempts to interfere with update mechanisms in current and older Firefox versions.

While Mozilla didn’t share if the two add-ons were doing anything else malicious in the background, BleepingComputer found after analyzing them that they likely were using a reverse proxy to bypass paywalled sites.

However, the add-ons also had Mozilla’s domain in the paywall list which inadvertently also blocked browser updates.

A Mozilla spokesperson wasn’t able to provide more details when contacted by BleepingComputer earlier today.

How to make sure you’re not affected

Mozilla advises users to update their web browsers to at least the latest release version (Firefox 93), which can make sure that they’re protected from add-ons abusing the proxy API.

“It is always a good idea to keep Firefox up to date, and if you’re using Windows to make sure Microsoft Defender is running. Together, Firefox 93 and Defender will make sure you’re protected from this issue,” Tublitz and Colville added.

If you’re not running Firefox 93 and have not disabled browser updates, you could be impacted by this issue. To make sure, try to update Firefox to the latest versions since it bundles an updated blocklist designed to disable these malicious add-ons automatically.

If you still can’t update Firefox, you also have the option to find the add-ons that block you from upgrading to a newer version and remove them by going through these steps:

In the Add-ons section, search for one of the following entries:

NOTE: Make sure the IDs match exactly as there might be other, unrelated add-ons using those or similar names. If none of those IDs are shown in the list, you are not affected.

If you want to ensure that there are no traces left, you can also refresh Firefox to reset all add-ons and settings or start from scratch by downloading and installing a new copy of Firefox.

The only way that works isn’t also the most convenient

Bookmarking our favorite websites in the browser is something that we all do because it makes reloading them much faster at any time.

As a heavy user, I typically bookmark new pages every day, either because I find them very useful and just want to visit them regularly or just because I need to use them as part of the research I do for various articles.

The more pages I bookmark, the more difficult it is to figure out which one is which, despite the fact that I try to use straightforward names for each new item.

However, one of the things that come in handy when searching for a specific website in the bookmarks folder is the favicon, which helps me quickly find a page by simply checking out its logo.

On Softpedia.com, for example, our favicon is the signature S in the logo, so it’s pretty clear to tell when a bookmarked page points you to Softpedia.

One of the bugs that I occasionally come across in Mozilla Firefox, however, concerns these favicons, and by the looks of things, I’m not the only one. Users online have been complaining about favicons no longer loading or incorrectly using the icon of a different website for several Firefox versions, and as it turns out, a similar problem exists in the latest stable version too.

More specifically, here’s what it happens.

Let’s say you have two different pages saved in the Bookmarks Toolbar in Firefox, namely google.com and softpedia.com. Naturally, each of these two comes with its own favicon, with google.com using the typical G logo, while softpedia.com integrates the small S that I told you about earlier.

There are moments, however, when Firefox incorrectly loads the two favicons, so you end up either with the same favicon for google.com and softpedia.com or with Google’s favicon for Softpedia or the other way around.

Unfortunately, there’s no straightforward way to resolve this problem, and the only workaround isn’t at all very convenient.

Technically, the problem should fix itself by simply loading the broken favicon in Firefox. So if the softpedia.com favicon does not load correctly, just click the bookmark to have the page loaded, and then the favicon should refresh automatically.

Because this doesn’t always work, the second step is to delete and re-add the broken page. This should technically refresh the favicon, and the correct version should now be displayed.

If this doesn’t work either, your only option is to completely delete the favicons cache. Unfortunately, this means Firefox won’t just refresh the favicon of the broken item, but all of them, so you’ll have to reload absolutely all pages in your bookmarks folder to get their favicons.

On a Windows device, the favicon cache can be found at the following location:

C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\profilename\faviocons.sqlite
Before deleting this file, you need to close Firefox. Favicons won’t be reloaded on launch, but when clicking each page in the bookmarks folder.

Needless to say, removing the favicons cache file may not the best way to go for users with a large collection of bookmarks, like me, but on the other hand, it’s pretty much the only workaround that could deal with the aforementioned issue.

At the same time, a wrong favicon isn’t necessarily something that makes Firefox impossible to use, albeit I do admit that at some level, it has a small impact on your experience with the app.

The steps mentioned above work regardless of the Firefox version that you use, including here Nightly builds – which, by the way, you shouldn’t use as your daily browser given it’s an experimental release.

Tired of distracting ad images cluttering up your web experience, or even your email? Here is a simple way to keep many of these ads from displaying in your browser. The technique below works for any Gecko-based browser (Mozilla, Firefox, Camino, Netscape7). It also works for Apple’s browser: Safari. See the special instructions for Safari below. And it even works with the Thunderbird mail client! See Thunderbird directions below. Also, check out the new notes on dealing with Flash advertising, below. Finally, I’ve improved the ad blocking based on user feedback. Already using it? Grab the latest for even better results.

Get the userContent.css file Updated: now GMail compatible!

What is in userContent.css?

How to use userContent.css with: Firefox/Mozilla/Camino/Netscape

You need to place the userContent.css file in the chrome directory of your browser user profile. The different browsers store your profile in slightly different places. For macos X, the profile chrome directory locations are:

How to use userContent.css with Safari

How to use userContent.css with Thunderbird New!

How does it work?

Once you have installed the userContent.css file, your browser will no longer show certain ad images and ad iframes. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, no worries. Simply install the userContent.css file and give it a try. Many ads in web pages will no longer be there!

If you know a little HTML and CSS, here’s how the rules in my userContent.css work. One of the CSS rules in the file has a set of selectors that look like A:link[HREF*=”ad.”] IMG and a rule that looks like < display: none ! important >. This selector is CSS’s way of saying Find all the images that are wrapped in links, where the link takes me to a url that has “ad.” somewhere in it . The rule is CSS-speak for Don’t display that image .

Then there are similar selectors paired with a rule that hides ad IFRAMES as well.

There are a bunch of different selectors I use, all of which are designed to match portions of urls that correspond to ads, without matching many urls that aren’t ads. Matching urls which aren’t ads are called false positives . If you have a false positive, that means that something that wasn’t an ad got blocked.

Quality Control – Minimizing False Positives

I run my browsers (both Mozilla and Safari) with my own ad blocking userContent.css full time. I have carefully designed my CSS selectors to catch ads but not other content. However, sometimes I still encounter a blocked image that should not have been blocked. To fix these I can do two things. First, I can find which ad selector matched the blocked content, and try to refine it in a way that still catches all the ads it had been catching, but no longer catches the blocked content. If I cannot find a way to do that, I simply ad a new selector to the rule at the very bottom of the userContent.css file. That rule is < display: inline ! important >, which is CSS-speak for display this normally . The selectors you see with this rule are all urls that correspond to false positives I found. For example, the use of the selector A:link[HREF*=”netflix.com/AddToQueue.”] IMG fixed the problem of invisible buttons on Netflix’s order form.

There are a number of other ad blocking css rule sets out there, several based on mine. Most are not as conservative in their blocking strategies as mine, though. If you have tried others and found they were too aggressive, give this one a try. Because it is conservative, it is also a great starting point for building your own customized userContent.css .

Dealing with Flash ads New!

The css rules I provide in userContent.css do not block Flash animations that are ads. To do that there are a couple of things you can try. The first is the simplest and works with any web browser: find the Flash library on your computer and delete it! This will eliminate all Flash animations in your web browser. If you are like me and don’t care much about sites that using Flash for things other than advertising, this solution should work well for you.

But what if you want to see something that is a Flash animation (like JibJab’s hilarious singalongs)? Well, if you use a Gecko-based browser like Firefox, Mozilla, Camino, or Netscape, you are in luck. Jesse Rudderman has authored some css that will hide all flash animations unless you click on them. If you click on them they are played. You can add his css directly into your userContent.css file and restart your browser to pick up this Flash blocking. You should also check out the rest of his excellent site for other browser tips.

I wanted a more subtle look to my blocked Flash ads than Jesse provided, so I altered his css to this for my use:

Feel free to use that if you like the look better.

MS-ISAC ADVISORY NUMBER:

DATE(S) ISSUED:

OVERVIEW:

Multiple vulnerabilities have been discovered in Mozilla Firefox and Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR), the most severe of which could allow for arbitrary code execution.

  • Mozilla Firefox is a web browser used to access the Internet.
  • Mozilla Firefox ESR is a version of the web browser intended to be deployed in large organizations.
    Successful exploitation of the most severe of these vulnerabilities could allow for arbitrary code execution in the context of the logged on user. Depending on the privileges associated with the user an attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than those who operate with administrative user rights.

THREAT INTELLIGENCE:

There are currently no reports of these vulnerabilities being exploited in the wild.

SYSTEMS AFFECTED:

  • Mozilla Firefox versions prior to 103
  • Mozilla Firefox versions prior to 102.1
  • Firefox ESR versions prior to 91.12
Government:
Businesses:
Home Users:

TECHNICAL SUMMARY:

Multiple vulnerabilities have been discovered in Mozilla Firefox and Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR), the most severe of which could allow for arbitrary code execution. Details of these vulnerabilities are as follows:
Tactic: Initial Access (TA0001):
Technique: Drive-by Compromise (T1189):

  • CVE-2022-2505: Memory safety bugs fixed in Firefox 103 and 102.1
  • CVE-2022-36320: Memory safety bugs fixed in Firefox 103
    Details of lower-severity vulnerabilities are as follows:
  • CVE-2022-36314: Opening local .lnk files could cause unexpected network loads
  • CVE-2022-36315: Preload Cache Bypasses Subresource Integrity
  • CVE-2022-36316: Performance API leaked whether a cross-site resource is redirecting
  • CVE-2022-36317: Long URL would hang Firefox for Android
  • CVE-2022-36318: Directory indexes for bundled resources reflected URL parameters
  • CVE-2022-36319: Mouse Position spoofing with CSS transforms
    Successful exploitation of the most severe of these vulnerabilities could allow for arbitrary code execution in the context of the logged on user. Depending on the privileges associated with the user an attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than those who operate with administrative user rights.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

We recommend the following actions be taken:

Apply appropriate updates provided by Mozilla to vulnerable systems immediately after appropriate testing. (M1051: Update Software)
o Safeguard 7.1: Establish and Maintain a Vulnerability Management Process: Establish and maintain a documented vulnerability management process for enterprise assets. Review and update documentation annually, or when significant enterprise changes occur that could impact this Safeguard.
o Safeguard 7.4: Perform Automated Application Patch Management: Perform application updates on enterprise assets through automated patch management on a monthly, or more frequent, basis.
o Safeguard 7.7: Remediate Detected Vulnerabilities: Remediate detected vulnerabilities in software through processes and tooling on a monthly, or more frequent, basis, based on the remediation process.
o Safeguard 9.1: Ensure Use of Only Fully Supported Browsers and Email Clients: Ensure only fully supported browsers and email clients are allowed to execute in the enterprise, only using the latest version of browsers and email clients provided through the vendor.

Restrict use of certain websites, block downloads/attachments, block Javascript, restrict browser extensions, etc. (M1021: Restrict Web-Based Content)
o Safeguard 9.2: Use DNS Filtering Services: Use DNS filtering services on all enterprise assets to block access to known malicious domains.
o Safeguard 9.3: Maintain and Enforce Network-Based URL Filters: Enforce and update network-based URL filters to limit an enterprise asset from connecting to potentially malicious or unapproved websites. Example implementations include category-based filtering, reputation-based filtering, or through the use of block lists. Enforce filters for all enterprise assets.
o Safeguard 9.6: Block Unnecessary File Types: Block unnecessary file types attempting to enter the enterprise’s email gateway.

Apply the Principle of Least Privilege to all systems and services. Run all software as a non-privileged user (one without administrative privileges) to diminish the effects of a successful attack. (M1026: Privileged Account Management)
o Safeguard 4.7: Manage Default Accounts on Enterprise Assets and Software: Manage default accounts on enterprise assets and software, such as root, administrator, and other pre-configured vendor accounts. Example implementations can include: disabling default accounts or making them unusable.
o Safeguard 5.4: Restrict Administrator Privileges to Dedicated Administrator Accounts: Restrict administrator privileges to dedicated administrator accounts on enterprise assets. Conduct general computing activities, such as internet browsing, email, and productivity suite use, from the user’s primary, non-privileged account.

Restrict execution of code to a virtual environment on or in transit to an endpoint system. (M1048: Application Isolation and Sandboxing)
o Safeguard 4.1: Establish and Maintain a Secure Configuration Process: Establish and maintain a secure configuration process for enterprise assets (end-user devices, including portable and mobile, non-computing/IoT devices, and servers) and software (operating systems and applications). Review and update documentation annually, or when significant enterprise changes occur that could impact this Safeguard.
o Safeguard 16.8: Separate Production and Non-Production Systems: Maintain separate environments for production and non-production systems.

Use capabilities to detect and block conditions that may lead to or be indicative of a software exploit occurring. (M1050: Exploit Protection)
o Safeguard 10.5: Enable Anti-Exploitation Features: Enable anti-exploitation features on enterprise assets and software, where possible, such as Microsoft® Data Execution Prevention (DEP), Windows® Defender Exploit Guard (WDEG), or Apple® System Integrity Protection (SIP) and Gatekeeper™.

Inform and educate users regarding the threats posed by hypertext links contained in emails or attachments especially from un-trusted sources. Remind users not to visit un-trusted websites or follow links provided by unknown or un-trusted sources. (M1017: User Training)
o Safeguard 14.1: Establish and Maintain a Security Awareness Program: Establish and maintain a security awareness program. The purpose of a security awareness program is to educate the enterprise’s workforce on how to interact with enterprise assets and data in a secure manner. Conduct training at hire and, at a minimum, annually. Review and update content annually, or when significant enterprise changes occur that could impact this Safeguard.

o Safeguard 14.2: Train Workforce Members to Recognize Social Engineering Attacks: Train workforce members to recognize social engineering attacks, such as phishing, pre-texting, and tailgating.

Want to install add-ons like Adblocker in Mozilla Firefox? Here is this tutorial where we will learn how to install the extensions for this open-source browser on Windows, Linux, or macOS.

To extend the functionality and feature of the browser we use extensions and the same goes for FireFox as well. For example, if you want to block advertisements in FireFox completely, then we can use extensions such as Adblocker that need to be installed separately in Mozilla Firefox. The so-called add-ons/extensions make it easier for us to surf or enable you to use new functions. We’ll show you how to install and manage these extensions in Mozilla Firefox:

Installing add-ons on Mozilla Firefox

Step 1: Open Mozilla Browser, it doesn’t matter if you are on Windows, Linux, or macOS; the further steps will be the same for all.

Step 2: Under Mozilla Firefox, you can find the add-ons in the burger menu () at the top right, click that. Alternatively, you can use the key combination [Ctrl] + [Shift] + [A] directly to access the add-on menu. In the Add-ons Manager, you have an overview of all available extensions.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Step 3: To install an add-on, click the desired icon of the extension. If the extension you want to install is not in the recommended list, click in the Search box and type the name of the Add-on you want to install, and hit the Enter key.

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Step 4: After that list of Add–ons will appears, select the one you want to install and then hit the “Add to Firefox” button.

for example:

How to Block a Website in Mozilla Firefox

Step 5: The browser then downloads the plug-in. When this process is complete, click Install/Add button in the pop-up that appears to complete the process.

Step 6: Depending on the extension, you will then need to restart Firefox. After that, you will have successfully installed the add-on.

How to Remove FireFox Add-ons

Step 1: If you want to uninstall some of the installed Add-ons on your FireFox, then open the browser and then use the keyboard shortcut- Ctlr+Alt+A to open the Add-on manager.

Step 2: Under the Extensions tab given on the left side, you will see the list of all installed Add-ons.

Step 3: Find the one you want to remove, after that click on the three dots given in front of that.

Step 4: Select the Remove option and again click on the Remove button that appears on the pop-up window. This will uninstall the extension. Alternatively, you can use the Toggle button given in front of each installed extension to disable it.